S3: William Sloan

S3: Private William Sloan

  • 1-1st Ayrshire Yeomanry
  • Died 15th November 1915, Age 21

S04_WilliamSloan

Inscription

ERECTED
BY
JAMES AND GRACE JANE SLOAN
ROUGHSIDE
IN LOVING MEMORY OF
THEIR SON JAMES
WHO DIED 18TH MARCH 1899 IN INFANCY
THEIR DAUGHTER MARGARET MCMICHAEL
DIED 9TH MARCH 1912 IN HER 16TH YEAR
THEIR SON WILLIAM
TROOPER 1-1ST AYRSHIRE YEOMANRY
DIED IN HOSPITAL AT HELLES CAPE GALLIPOLI
15TH NOV 1915 AGED 21 YEARS
THE ABOVE JAMES SLOAN
DIED AT HURKLEDALE, CUMMERTREES, DUMFRIESSHIRE
2ND OCT 1942 AGED 74 YEARS
ALSO HIS WIFE GRACE STEELE SLOAN
DIED AT HURKLEDALE, CUMMERTREES, DUMFRIESSHIRE
25TH MAY 1943 AGED 74 YEARS

Family Life

The Sloan family have a long association with the farm of Roughside in the parish of New Cumnock. However the links with William Sloan and Roughside begin within his grandparents

A. William Sloan and Jane Harvey

  • James (b.1871),  William (b. 1869), John (b.1872),  Mungo (b.1879)

William Sloan was the the son of James Sloan, farmer at Crofthead, Sorn and Charlottte Hood. In 1867 he married Jane Harvey daughter William Harvey, landed proprietor and farmer, Miid Heillar, Sorn and Agnes Clark.

Together William and Jane had four sons, including eldest son James, all born at Sorn. The family moved to Roughside farm , New Cumnock some time beween 1885 and 1891 at which time the tenant was Peter Sloan, Knockterra, Old Cumnock and possibly a family relative.  William later moved to Castlemaines farm, New Cumnock while eldest son James continued to farm at Roughside.

map_roughside

map

 B. James Sloan and Grace Steele

  • William (b.1894 d. 1915), Margaret (b.1897, d.1912), Jane (b.1901), John (b.1903), Grace (b.1906), James (b.1909)

In 1893 James married Grace Jane Steele the daughter of James Steele, farmer Merkland, New Cumnock and Margaret McMichael.  Together they had six children including eldest son William who was born at Roughside farm on 22nd March 1894.

roughside

Roughside

Military Service

Ayrshire Yeomanry

The roots of the Ayrshire Yeomanry can be traced back to 1794 when it was formed as a Fencible Calvary of the Earl of Cassillis. In 1798 it was formally adopted into the Army List as the Ayrshire Regiment of Yeomanry Calvary formed as part of Britain’s defences to combat any threat of invasion from France during the Napoleonic wars

On the outbreak of the First World War, the Regiment was one of the fastest to react to the mobilisation order following which the Regiment joined the Lowland Mounted Brigade and remained in the United Kingdom, on home defence duties, until 1915. The Regiment finally deployed overseas in September of that year, where it took part in the Gallipoli landings, serving as dismounted infantry.

On 10th December 1915 the Cumnock Chronicle report the death of William Sloan

We deeply regret to learn that Tpr. William Sloan, of the Ayrshire Yeomanry – son of Mr. James Sloan of Roughside, and grandson of Mr. William Sloan, Castlemains, – has died at the Dardanelles.

THE LATE TPR. WM. SLOAN

Mr James Sloan, Roughside, father of the late Trooper William Sloan, has received the following letter from Col. J.D. Boswell :-

“It is with the very greatest regret and sympathy that I writre you about the death of your son Willie. This took place at the Beach Hospital, Cape Helles, Gallipoli, on Monday evening, 15th November, the cause being peritonitis. The Yeomanry went up to the trenches in the last week of October, but your son, who as you know was C.O.’s orderly, was left at the rest camp along with certain other headquarters staff. He came up and saw me in the trenches two or three times, and it was a matter of remark how well he then looked. It was therefore a great surprise to hear that he had gone to hospital. I could not go and see him myself, as I could not leave my post at that time when we had the regiment in the firing line. Indeed a move forward was actually being made. It was on Monday evening I heard of his death.  The regiment came down from the trenches on Wednesday, 17th, and having got his remains from the hospital we buried him in the little cemetry of the 52nd Lowland Division, just beside our rest camp.  Dr. Ewing, of Grange Church, Edinburgh officiated as minister at the burial. I was present with most of the officers. Trumpet-Major O’Neill and the regimental trumpeters sounded the last post. For my own part I was very much touched by your son’s death, closely associated as I have been with him, and I know all the Yeomanry were, for he was a great favourite and had always done so well. I do not know that I can add mre usefully to this, except to again express my sincere regret and sympathy. — Yours very truly, J.D. Boswell.”

Mr. Sloan has also received a most kind and sympathetic letter from Captain Fred. J. Turner, commanding the Troop of which Tpr. Sloan was a member. Capt. Turner in the course of the letter of says —

Willie was a real good fellow – one who was a credit to his parents , his country and his regiment. You must feel proud that God gave you a son who as ably and willingly answered his country’s call”

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